The Four-Step Process for Hypnotherapy

 

Advertisements

Good Breathing Technique for Lifting Weights

 

Breathing pic
Breathing
Image: livestrong.com

A successful life coach in Arizona, Peter Winslow divides his time between helping clients achieve their goals as the owner of GoldMind, LLC, and guiding people toward managing ankylosing spondylitis (AS) as the founder of the AS Victors Club. When he’s not busy with his work as a life coach, Peter Winslow enjoys weight training.

Many people don’t think about breathing when they weight lift, but incorrect breathing technique increases the risk of injury and can cause blood pressure spikes, vision disturbances, and bursting blood vessels. To get the right breathing technique, individuals should begin controlling their breathing before they even start lifting. Depending on how intense a planned lifting session will be, this pre-lift regulation should begin 30 to 45 seconds before picking up the weights.

As a person picks up the weights, he should breathe out. This part of the exercise exerts the body, as does lifting or pushing the weight. It is known as the concentric phase of a lift and results in the muscle shortening or contracting.

During the concentric phase, people are more likely to hold their breath because they are straining their body. This maneuver is known as the Valsalva maneuver and is commonly seen among people lifting extremely heavy weights that require a great deal of exertion. For most people, it’s safer to avoid the Valsalva maneuver altogether and instead focus on breathing out in a controlled manner as they exercise.

Individuals must then breathe in as they drop the weight back down. This phase involves lengthening the muscle and is known as the eccentric phase of weight lifting. It is usually less strenuous on the body, so it’s the ideal time to breathe in.

Three Signs That Your Career is Stagnant

peter winslow (life coach)
Peter Winslow, Life Coach

For more than a 15 years, Peter Winslow has worked as a life coach in Arizona. The owner of GoldMind, LLC, he shows people their own greatness and helps them meet their goals. Over the course of his career as a life coach, Peter Winslow has written four books and helped numerous clients advance their careers.

Below are several signs that your career has stagnated:

You’re bored with work
Over time, you will get used to your work. Things will start feeling static and monotonous, and you’ll end up making more mistakes because you won’t put in the effort you once did. This usually happens when your job no longer challenges you and you aren’t getting new tasks regularly to offset the boredom.

Your last promotion was at least four years ago
It’s extremely frustrating to get passed over for a promotion several years in a row. But it can help signify that it’s time to look for work elsewhere because you’ve reached a ceiling in your job. Your loyalty to your company and your hard work should be regularly rewarded with new responsibilities and higher salaries that keep you interested.

You aren’t learning anything new
Regardless of how many years you went to school, there is always more to learn in your field through hands-on experience. In fact, learning about your field will likely never stop since every industry is constantly advancing and growing. If you can’t remember the last time your work taught you something new, it’s time to take a new career path.

Yama – One of Raja Yoga’s Eight Principles

 

 Raja Yoga pic
Raja Yoga
Image: dailyyoga.com

Accomplished life coach Peter Winslow helps clients attain their goals and heal their bodies and minds as the owner of GoldMind, LLC. A practitioner of what he teaches, Peter Winslow enjoys producing guided meditations and teaching raja yoga.

Raja yoga, meaning king yoga, teaches practitioners how to be independent and autonomous. It is also known as Ashtanga yoga and consists of eight steps, the first of which is called yama. This part focuses on self-control and one’s ethical standards. Practitioners learning about yama are encouraged to consider how they conduct themselves in daily life and change their behavior to match how they want to be treated by others.

There are five different yamas that practitioners must commit to: ahimsa, satya, asteya, aparigraha, and brahmacharya. Ahimsa is the commitment to do no harm to any other living being. It is the non-violence principle of raja yoga and teaches practitioners to avoid any death of animals. Meanwhile, satya teaches truthfulness and encourages practitioners to avoid exceeding their limits. Individuals must commit to speaking the truth in everyday life and also conveying the truth by not making excuses or hiding their true face from others.

Asteya is responsible for practitioners making a commitment to never steal. Material objects and mental property that belong to another person should never be taken from them, nor should the environment ever be ruined. Along this same line of thought, aparigraha states that people should not accumulate possessions or worries. These things are left behind when a person leaves this world and bring freedom to a person when left behind in life.

Finally, brahmacharya teaches practitioners to live a pure life. Many people misinterpret this yama as abstaining from sexual desires, but it actually means that a person should always turn their thoughts toward a higher power. At the same time, a person should always fulfill their duties on earth.