Meditations

I’m life coach and transpersonal guide Peter Winslow. Most of you who know me, know I favor the early mornings for meditation. Most learned sages teach that four am, twelve noon and eight pm are the three times of day that provide the best opportunity for tuning in, with four am being the time when we are “nearest to the veil” that separates the material world from the essential realms. This is because everywhere on the planet, four am is the time at which everything is most quiet.

Just before the illuminating rays of dawn, nature rests in a state of flux. Terrestrial balance is stable, cleansed of the previous day’s frenetic energy and the effects of humanity’s dominion and industry. It’s in these early hours that the animal aspects of mind remain in slumber, though a deeper essence is fully awake. For a brief time, sleep has purged the emotional attachments we accumulate, and our subconscious acuity is highly perceptive.

Meditation at this still yet energetically reticulated time of day allows us to connect with inner awareness in a very profound and intimate way. Simple awareness becomes a mirror of worldly consciousness; as we awaken with the planet, we gain the opportunity to purposefully set the tone for the coming day. Even a slight moment of quietude at the muted moments of dawn can put the day into perspective. Each morning, our day’s destiny is not yet fixed, and as such there is nothing we cannot do.

Practice this yourself and discover what the wisest among us have taught from time immemorial: you are deeper than you know, deeper than you can know. It’s in our meditations that we witness the depth of who we truly are.

–Peter Winslow

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Part Four: Natural Healing from Chronic Pain

I’m life coach and counselor Peter Winslow. Welcome to part four of our series on the science of natural healing from chronic pain. We have so far learned that the key to recovery from chronic conditions is found in the phenomenon of “neuroplasticity.”

Neurologists have discovered that neuroplasticity works in two ways; it can be either positive or negative. An example of negative plasticity: many elderly people are understandably afraid of falling. Trying to avoid an accident by looking down at the ground in front of them while they walk narrows their field of vision which in turn trains the brain to decrease physical coordination and balance. The resulting changes in the brain actually impair physical mobility and increase the likelihood of a fall, the one thing they were focused on, but trying to prevent.

Researchers tell us that chronic pain is also an example of negative plasticity. It’s the result of the brain repeatedly firing signals on specific neural pathways over time until what was once temporary information becomes an ingrained habit.

It’s like driving a truck on a muddy dirt road; the more you drive over them, the deeper the grooves become. The repeated pain sensations in your body construct an “information superhighway” on the roadmap of the brain, but it is not necessarily a permanent fixture.

Researchers have learned that chronic pain in the body can be reversed through neuroplasticity in the brain. You simply have to adopt the specific habits, behaviors and exercises that replace the old habits and patterns of the past.

If you want to build a healthier body than the one you’ve got now, you can certainly do it. Incorporating mind-body techniques into your exercise regimen is proven to reverse chronic pain and illness, and the sooner you begin, the better off you’ll be.

–Peter Winslow