Meditations

I’m life coach and transpersonal guide Peter Winslow. Most of you who know me, know I favor the early mornings for meditation. Most learned sages teach that four am, twelve noon and eight pm are the three times of day that provide the best opportunity for tuning in, with four am being the time when we are “nearest to the veil” that separates the material world from the essential realms. This is because everywhere on the planet, four am is the time at which everything is most quiet.

Just before the illuminating rays of dawn, nature rests in a state of flux. Terrestrial balance is stable, cleansed of the previous day’s frenetic energy and the effects of humanity’s dominion and industry. It’s in these early hours that the animal aspects of mind remain in slumber, though a deeper essence is fully awake. For a brief time, sleep has purged the emotional attachments we accumulate, and our subconscious acuity is highly perceptive.

Meditation at this still yet energetically reticulated time of day allows us to connect with inner awareness in a very profound and intimate way. Simple awareness becomes a mirror of worldly consciousness; as we awaken with the planet, we gain the opportunity to purposefully set the tone for the coming day. Even a slight moment of quietude at the muted moments of dawn can put the day into perspective. Each morning, our day’s destiny is not yet fixed, and as such there is nothing we cannot do.

Practice this yourself and discover what the wisest among us have taught from time immemorial: you are deeper than you know, deeper than you can know. It’s in our meditations that we witness the depth of who we truly are.

–Peter Winslow

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Resolute Ideas Part Two

I’m life coach and star tsar Peter Winslow. Here are 20 more things for you to consider thoughtfully in the year 2017 to take charge of what moves and motivates you in life:

20 MORE THINGS TO CONSIDER IN 2017

  1. Laugh more often. Realize that this is how gratitude really feels.
  2. Refuse to argue. Instead, agree to disagree.
  3. Communicate with your family more often.
  4. Give something positive to someone each day.
  5. Forgive everyone for everything, including yourself.
  6. Spend more time with people over the age of 70 and under the age of 6.
  7. Make other people smile every day.
  8. Remember that what they think of you is none of your business.
  9. Your job won’t take care of you when you are sick, your friends will. Stay in touch.
  10. Walk your talk.
  11. Move everything that isn’t useful, beautiful or joyful out of your space.
  12. Know that everything that needs to heal, can be healed.
  13. Realize that everything changes.
  14. No matter how you feel, get up, dress up and show up.
  15. Believe that the best is yet to come.
  16. Start everyday feeling grateful.
  17. See the world with childlike wonder again.
  18. Accept what is. Modify your inner perception of it.
  19. Know that happiness is a personal choice.
  20. Choose wisely.

I trust this completed list of 40 Thing To Consider in 2017 has given you much to think about, and perhaps even more to take action on. Tally ho

–Peter Winslow

How the Mind Creates Stress Part Two

How the Mind Creates Stress Part Two
How the Mind Creates Stress Part Two

Hello, I’m life coach Peter Winslow, and the topic is stress and stress related illness. Let’s get right to it: in the short term, emotional stress can cause headache and pain, upset stomach, and heart palpitations. When our emotional traumas remain repressed or ignored, they can lead to ill conditions such as chronic autoimmune disorders. Heart disease, hypertension, obesity, alcoholism, drug abuse, fatigue, depression, and some cancers are just a few of the many common ailments attributed in part to chronic stress.

When under stress, the onboard survival mechanisms in the body can “hijack” the brain in response to a deadline, a dreaded phone call, an argument, or even just a scary thought. That’s why people can sit at a desk all day, and by the end of the workday feel exhausted, like they just ran a marathon. They simmer in a steady flow of stress hormones day after day and pay a heavy price for it.

Of course, stress is a subjective condition, meaning it’s not measured by the same yardstick for everyone. Some people thrive on stress while others run from it. One person’s idea of a good time can be terrifying to others; think bungee jumping, cage fighting, bull riding or drag racing. Staggering stress is an exciting thrill ride for some. For others it’s cardiac arrest.

In this way, we’re all fairly unique. The cells and tissues in our bodies hold the memories of past traumas, which are physical, emotional, and even ancestral in nature. Over time, it can take more extreme exposure to achieve the same “rush” we used to get from an exciting activity. Or the opposite can happen; the build-up of stress in the body can cause a host of problems, including chronic illness.

–Peter Winslow

How Your Mind Creates Stress

How Your Mind Creates Stress
How Your Mind Creates Stress

Hello, I’m life coach Peter Winslow. Lately we’ve been learning about stress and how it can cause severe illness and disease. Now let’s look at a definition. Wikipedia defines stress this way:

“Stress refers to the consequence of the failure of an organism— human or animal—to respond appropriately to emotional or physical threats, whether actual or imagined.”

Did you get that? Stress is not only caused by an actual threat, it’s also caused by nothing more than your imagination. As a life coach, I hear many examples of this from my clients on a daily basis.

Know why some people cry when the hero tragically dies during a movie? They know perfectly well that nobody really died, but their subconscious minds respond to the stimulus as if it were real. This is because the subconscious mind cannot tell the difference between what is real, and what is vividly imagined.

This is critical information to take advantage of if you’d like to improve your health. And by the way, without this inborn subconscious function, going to the movies wouldn’t be nearly as much fun!

We know that stress is a mental state that creates an emotional response in the body, which means it’s a mind-body phenomenon. And what is an emotional response? Emotions are electromagnetic signals sent out from the brain to communicate a particular message to the body at the cellular level. Then, neurochemicals and hormones kick in to provide what we feel in response to the mental information we’re busy processing.

Medical textbooks state that over 90 percent of all illnesses in the U.S. are due to stress and other mind-body factors. This means that nine times out of ten, there is an emotional stressor underlying the disease. Worry, frustration, anger, resentment, unworthiness, loneliness, anxiety, depression, and other emotional factors are known to cause the symptoms of stress, and lead to stress-related illness.

–Peter Winslow