Resolute Ideas Part Two

I’m life coach and star tsar Peter Winslow. Here are 20 more things for you to consider thoughtfully in the year 2017 to take charge of what moves and motivates you in life:

20 MORE THINGS TO CONSIDER IN 2017

  1. Laugh more often. Realize that this is how gratitude really feels.
  2. Refuse to argue. Instead, agree to disagree.
  3. Communicate with your family more often.
  4. Give something positive to someone each day.
  5. Forgive everyone for everything, including yourself.
  6. Spend more time with people over the age of 70 and under the age of 6.
  7. Make other people smile every day.
  8. Remember that what they think of you is none of your business.
  9. Your job won’t take care of you when you are sick, your friends will. Stay in touch.
  10. Walk your talk.
  11. Move everything that isn’t useful, beautiful or joyful out of your space.
  12. Know that everything that needs to heal, can be healed.
  13. Realize that everything changes.
  14. No matter how you feel, get up, dress up and show up.
  15. Believe that the best is yet to come.
  16. Start everyday feeling grateful.
  17. See the world with childlike wonder again.
  18. Accept what is. Modify your inner perception of it.
  19. Know that happiness is a personal choice.
  20. Choose wisely.

I trust this completed list of 40 Thing To Consider in 2017 has given you much to think about, and perhaps even more to take action on. Tally ho

–Peter Winslow

Resolute Ideas

I’m life coach and star maker Peter Winslow. We’re well into the year 2017 now, and it’s an ideal time to take stock of what moves and motivates us. In the spirit of transition, I thought I’d send this along to you:

20 THINGS TO CONSIDER IN 2017

  1. Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince and dinner like a dieter.
  2. Drink more water
  3. Eat more plants and foods that grow on trees, less food that is processed and manufactured.
  4. Live with the 3 E’s — Energy, Enthusiasm and Enjoyment.
  5. Make time to meditate and pray regularly.
  6. Play more games.
  7. Read more than you did in 2016.
  8. Sit in silence for at least 10 minutes each day.
  9. Sleep at least 7 hours each night.
  10. Take a brisk walk daily and smile while you walk.
  11. Cease comparing yourself to others. You have no idea what their life is really like.
  12. Let go of negative thoughts about things you cannot control.
  13. Invest more energy into being present in the moment.
  14. Don’t take yourself too seriously, because no one else does.
  15. Don’t waste your energy on paying attention to what others say and do.
  16. Dream while you are awake.
  17. Stop reminding others of their mistakes.
  18. Make peace with your past.
  19. Realize that your challenges are important teachers.
  20. Life challenges come and go, but the lessons can last a lifetime.

Be sure to stay tuned for 20 More Things to Consider in 2017 coming soon to a device near you.

–Peter Winslow

Part Four: Natural Healing from Chronic Pain

I’m life coach and counselor Peter Winslow. Welcome to part four of our series on the science of natural healing from chronic pain. We have so far learned that the key to recovery from chronic conditions is found in the phenomenon of “neuroplasticity.”

Neurologists have discovered that neuroplasticity works in two ways; it can be either positive or negative. An example of negative plasticity: many elderly people are understandably afraid of falling. Trying to avoid an accident by looking down at the ground in front of them while they walk narrows their field of vision which in turn trains the brain to decrease physical coordination and balance. The resulting changes in the brain actually impair physical mobility and increase the likelihood of a fall, the one thing they were focused on, but trying to prevent.

Researchers tell us that chronic pain is also an example of negative plasticity. It’s the result of the brain repeatedly firing signals on specific neural pathways over time until what was once temporary information becomes an ingrained habit.

It’s like driving a truck on a muddy dirt road; the more you drive over them, the deeper the grooves become. The repeated pain sensations in your body construct an “information superhighway” on the roadmap of the brain, but it is not necessarily a permanent fixture.

Researchers have learned that chronic pain in the body can be reversed through neuroplasticity in the brain. You simply have to adopt the specific habits, behaviors and exercises that replace the old habits and patterns of the past.

If you want to build a healthier body than the one you’ve got now, you can certainly do it. Incorporating mind-body techniques into your exercise regimen is proven to reverse chronic pain and illness, and the sooner you begin, the better off you’ll be.

–Peter Winslow

Part Three: The Brain Science of Neuroplasticity

I’m Life coach and counselor Peter Winslow, and this is part three of our series on the science of natural recovery from chronic pain. How is it possible? Neuroscientists describe the process through a phenomenon called “neuroplasticity.”

In cases of head injuries that cause blindness, neuroscientists have observed amazing changes in the brains of the victims. Using brain imaging scans they have isolated electro-magnetic energy emitted by the visual cortex, a portion consisting of approximately one third of the brain, and found that this region has adapted and retrained itself in these patients to supervise completely different skills.

Neuroplasticity is the process by which many blind people develop their highly acute senses of hearing, touch, taste and smell and are often able to master completely new tasks and creative endeavors that the rest of us find challenging and even impossible to do.

Until the mid-1990’s it was believed that brain cells do not regenerate beyond the formative years of development, after about two or three years of age. Scientists now know that’s incorrect. Through a process called “neurogenesis” brand new neurons are created when you enrich your environment by taking up new and interesting mental exercises like learning a foreign language, or utilizing mind-body practices like meditation.

Tackling challenging skills like these helps to ward off Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia because the process increases cognitive ability and rebuilds memory function. This means that new and challenging mind-body activities enhance neuroplasticity in the brain.

Here’s the catch: doctors say the initial changes are only temporary because you have to be emotionally engaged in the process to retain the results.

Permanent plasticity occurs when you feel passion, élan, savior faire and a zest for life because positive thoughts and a sense of wellbeing are critical for the release of the specific neurotransmitters and the other brain chemicals that enable the changes to stick.

Your new skills must be taxing, interesting and highly motivating for the results to become permanent. This is solid proof of the mind-body connection: you must consciously choose to feel passion and motivation before your brain can make the physical changes lasting and permanent.

–Peter Winslow