Studies Show Yoga’s Many Health Benefits

Raja Yoga pic
Raja Yoga
Image: dailyyoga.com

Peter Winslow, owner of GoldMind, LLC, is the author of four books on healing and self-empowerment. A transformational life coach, Peter Winslow lives in Scottsdale, Arizona, a mecca for yoga and other mind-body practices.

Yoga combines physical positioning, breathing strategies, and relaxation techniques. It has been shown to relieve certain conditions, including stress. A survey of over 1,000 yoga participants revealed improvements in stress-related physical and psychological symptoms, as well as better mental and emotional health, with increases in resilience and overall mental well-being.

In a 2018 survey, almost 2,000 young adults attributed their improved eating and fitness habits to a regular yoga practice. Practicing yoga has also been shown to contribute to more restful sleep for patients with cancer, women who are pregnant or having symptoms of menopause, and people with arthritis. And research involving 688 healthy individuals found that yoga helped improve balance (important for fall prevention). In addition, the American College of Physicians recommends yoga as a first-line treatment for chronic low-back pain.

Overall, studies indicate that carefully applying yoga poses with the guidance of an experienced instructor can improve quality of life.

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Common Symptoms Associated with Ankylosing Spondylitis

Peter Winslow, a Scottsdale-based life coach and owner of GoldMind, helps clients achieve optimal health and personal fulfillment. The author of four books on self-empowerment and healing, Peter Winslow wrote about the powerful strategies he learned to battle the autoimmune disease ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in his book, Heal for Real.

An inflammatory disease that usually affects spinal vertebrae, AS can result in spinal vertebrae being fused, which restricts flexibility and can lead to bad posture and chronic pain. Early signs of AS include stiffness and pain in the neck, low back, and hips, especially after periods of rest. The sacroiliac joint, where the low back meets the hip, and the vertebrae in the low back are frequently affected, as well as the places where tendons, ligaments, or cartilage attach to bones.

While there is no cure for AS, certain treatments can alleviate symptoms and the disease’s progression. Patients should seek medical advice or consider alternative therapies if they experience low back or buttock pain that is getting progressively worse or that wakes them from sleep. As discussed in his book, Heal for Real, Winslow has achieved significant relief from painful AS symptoms by mastering the technique of guided imagery, a research-supported method for natural pain management.

The Four-Step Process for Hypnotherapy

 

Good Breathing Technique for Lifting Weights

 

Breathing pic
Breathing
Image: livestrong.com

A successful life coach in Arizona, Peter Winslow divides his time between helping clients achieve their goals as the owner of GoldMind, LLC, and guiding people toward managing ankylosing spondylitis (AS) as the founder of the AS Victors Club. When he’s not busy with his work as a life coach, Peter Winslow enjoys weight training.

Many people don’t think about breathing when they weight lift, but incorrect breathing technique increases the risk of injury and can cause blood pressure spikes, vision disturbances, and bursting blood vessels. To get the right breathing technique, individuals should begin controlling their breathing before they even start lifting. Depending on how intense a planned lifting session will be, this pre-lift regulation should begin 30 to 45 seconds before picking up the weights.

As a person picks up the weights, he should breathe out. This part of the exercise exerts the body, as does lifting or pushing the weight. It is known as the concentric phase of a lift and results in the muscle shortening or contracting.

During the concentric phase, people are more likely to hold their breath because they are straining their body. This maneuver is known as the Valsalva maneuver and is commonly seen among people lifting extremely heavy weights that require a great deal of exertion. For most people, it’s safer to avoid the Valsalva maneuver altogether and instead focus on breathing out in a controlled manner as they exercise.

Individuals must then breathe in as they drop the weight back down. This phase involves lengthening the muscle and is known as the eccentric phase of weight lifting. It is usually less strenuous on the body, so it’s the ideal time to breathe in.