Heal for Real Offers Guidance in Overcoming Effects of Chronic Illness

Heal for Realpic
Heal for Real
Image: helpinghealing.com

A transformative life coach in Scottsdale, Arizona, Peter Winslow provides direction on personal and life choices that range from career advancement and wealth consciousness to healing and empowerment. Peter Winslow also offers guidance on coping with the degenerative autoimmune disorder ankylosing spondylitis (AS), based on his own experiences with the condition. He developed a program for overcoming chronic pain associated with AS and published his findings in the 2010 book Heal for Real.

The book covers the trials and tribulations following his AS diagnosis and the steps he took to overcome the depression and addictions that occurred as a result. He shares his tools and techniques for creating positive changes in the body, designed to help overcome chronic pain and regain control from an incurable condition. His tips are also interwoven with powerful scientific and philosophic pieces of wisdom that promote dynamic healing.

Heal for Real is available in both physical and e-book format.

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Feel, Don’t Think – Avoiding Eating as a Temporary Solution to Stress

 

Peter Winslow
Peter Winslow, Life Coach

Peter Winslow is a Scottsdale, Arizona-based life coach who engages with people from all backgrounds to help them realize inner strengths and overcome anxiety. Through programs such as The Three Minute Miracle to End Anxiety, Peter Winslow helps break addictive cycles of stress, adrenaline production, and overeating.

For many, mindless eating becomes a coping mechanism when they are depressed, as carb consumption raises the brain’s serotonin levels and releases a sense of soothing pleasure and tension release. With the temporary lift followed by a crash, the addictive cycle starts anew and leads to unhealthy weight gain.

The Three Minute Miracle, which Winslow refers to as the “Cortisol Kill Switch,” centers on employing the brain to halt stress hormones and panic mechanisms that lead to the fight-or-flight response taking hold. The secret to this is feeling instead of thinking. This seems counterintuitive, as the anxious person is usually trying not to feel dread and panic. Unfortunately, the very act of resistance, or trying to get away from anxiety, keeps stress hormones elevated and makes the situation worse.

Part Four: Natural Healing from Chronic Pain

I’m life coach and counselor Peter Winslow. Welcome to part four of our series on the science of natural healing from chronic pain. We have so far learned that the key to recovery from chronic conditions is found in the phenomenon of “neuroplasticity.”

Neurologists have discovered that neuroplasticity works in two ways; it can be either positive or negative. An example of negative plasticity: many elderly people are understandably afraid of falling. Trying to avoid an accident by looking down at the ground in front of them while they walk narrows their field of vision which in turn trains the brain to decrease physical coordination and balance. The resulting changes in the brain actually impair physical mobility and increase the likelihood of a fall, the one thing they were focused on, but trying to prevent.

Researchers tell us that chronic pain is also an example of negative plasticity. It’s the result of the brain repeatedly firing signals on specific neural pathways over time until what was once temporary information becomes an ingrained habit.

It’s like driving a truck on a muddy dirt road; the more you drive over them, the deeper the grooves become. The repeated pain sensations in your body construct an “information superhighway” on the roadmap of the brain, but it is not necessarily a permanent fixture.

Researchers have learned that chronic pain in the body can be reversed through neuroplasticity in the brain. You simply have to adopt the specific habits, behaviors and exercises that replace the old habits and patterns of the past.

If you want to build a healthier body than the one you’ve got now, you can certainly do it. Incorporating mind-body techniques into your exercise regimen is proven to reverse chronic pain and illness, and the sooner you begin, the better off you’ll be.

–Peter Winslow

Healing from Chronic Pain: The Science of Neuroplasticity

I’m Peter Winslow, a health and life coach in private practice. I experienced first-hand the healing power of the human body when I recovered from the pain and symptoms of a chronic autoimmune disorder called Ankylosing Spondylitis, or AS.

It’s important to point out that the word “chronic” when applied to disease means that doctors and drugs cannot cure it. AS is considered to be “incurable” because there isn’t a medical treatment to reverse it. Yet people have recovered from this and other chronic conditions through the healing power of their own bodies. How is it possible? Neuroscientists say it happens through a phenomenon called neuroplasticity.

Webster’s dictionary defines neuroplasticity as “the ability of the brain to form and reorganize synaptic connections, especially in response to learning or experience or following injury.”

Wikipedia says:

“Neuroplasticity is an umbrella term that describes lasting change to the brain throughout an individual’s life course. The term gained prominence in the latter half of the 20th century, when new research showed that many aspects of the brain can be altered even into adulthood. This notion contrasts with the previous scientific understanding that the brain only develops during early childhood and from then on remains mostly unchanged.

Neuroplasticity can be seen at multiple levels, from changes in individual neurons to larger changes such as cortical remapping in response to injury. Behavior, environmental stimuli, thought, and emotions also cause neuroplastic change which has significant implications for healthy development, learning, memory, and recovery from illness and injury.”

So behavior, environmental stimuli, thought, and emotions cause neuroplastic changes. That is where natural recovery from chronic pain begins.

–Peter Winslow