Law of Emergence – Part Four

Hello I’m Peter Winslow, a life coach and counselor in Scottsdale AZ. We’ve been discussing the Law of Emergence, a superior realization of how to get what you want in life. It comes to us from life coach and New Thought philosopher Derek Rydall.

We looked at how to apply this law to achieve your dreams step by step, beginning here: first, change your language, and stop talking about what is “negative” in your world. Second and most importantly, stop looking at “why” your dream isn’t happening. It may feel counterintuitive, but that is what often blocks you—the search for (and focus on) what is holding you back.

Third, let all the “negative” stuff pass you by like flotsam on a river, and instead stay focused on navigating where that river is taking you. Give 100% of your attention to what you desire, and 0% to what you don’t.

More than an exercise, it’s a way of life—one which replaces any dogma that demands you must work hard to improve yourself before you can have your goals and dreams. While hard work has its reward, it is just not enough. For example, you can dig ditches 12 hours a day for years, fill them back in, and never reach a satisfying conclusion.

In many cases hard labor is counter-productive as it keeps you myopically bound to the toil at hand, unable to recognize the many hidden opportunities that pop up all around you—which then get picked up and taken advantage of by more open-minded adventurers.

The Law of Emergence entails a deep realization that replaces any inferior concept of who you are. Make this breathtaking breakthrough and you simply cannot return to any worn-out belief that somehow in some way, “I am not enough” and so must work harder and harder to “earn” your success.

You are not just a physical body; you are a mix of elements and energy operating in a quantum field. This realization combines inner harmony with outer order, and activates the Law of Emergence in very powerful ways.

When you finally get it, nothing can stand between you and whatsoever you would have, and be.

–Peter Winslow

That’s Right Too

I’m life coach and sometime philosopher Peter Winslow. When last we met I left you with a question: why do we feel the need to be right, even in the face of uncertainty or harm?

That’s right (har!)—it’s ego. Ego always has to be right. As a rule, every person believes that what he or she thinks is right, and no ego can be at rest with itself when it knows the beliefs it lives by are blatantly wrong.

And yet, we’ve all witnessed people who are never flustered when others disagree with them or charge them with being wrong. How do they do it? These people are generally happy with who they are; it follows that their egos are aligned with a deeper aspect, one which observes without judgment.

You’ve probably asked yourself the question more than once: would I rather be right—or happy? The next time you find yourself baited into an argument, put it to the test. Here’s how:

With all sincerity, tell the person confronting you with an argument that they’re right, and leave it at that. Remember, you are addressing their critical thinking—the ego—which wants to be right. By agreeing with them, you’ll take the wind out of their argument and defuse a potentially volatile situation. They may not even know how to respond to you, and the solution you seek will be much easier to find.

Even if your own ego is tying itself in knots over the issue at argument, this exercise is liberating. The payoff: When people disagree with you, realize they’re not opposing you; their egos are differing with the beliefs and constructs of your ego. Your job is to not take any of it personally. The solution really can be that simple.

– Peter Winslow

That’s Right

I’m life coach and part-time philosopher Peter Winslow. Lately I’ve become aware that like most people, I am very fond of being “right.” As I contemplated what this says about me, a deeper question fell into my lap: what if there was no such thing as “right” or “wrong?” In other words, what if everything was sacred?

There are well-established philosophies in the world that maintain the very same. They hold no moral high-ground for the concepts of right and wrong. To them, it’s simply a matter of law: actions have consequences, and we learn from our mistakes.

Karma, they call it. They believe, as the founders of the world’s great religions had taught, that there is no redemption in judging people as “right” or “wrong.” That task is left to providence.

Why then do so many people stake their happiness and sanity on the need to be right? It’s a Herculean task, considering that righteousness can be a moving target. Very often, what is right now may be left behind later on. Right or wrong, left or right… who’s to say?

It was once considered good and proper to own human beings, until enough people deemed it no longer right to do so. The argument split our country in two, leading a nation to war against itself. Many on both sides of the issue met their ends believing they were absolutely right.

What aspect of humankind so fervently feels the need to be right, even in the face of death and devastation?

The answer: the cognitive mind, also called ego. This is the aspect that pursues “rights and wrongs” with reckless abandon. Its very existence depends upon being “right,” to establish support for its beliefs, to impress those beliefs on others, and ultimately to have them capitulate in agreement.

Yes indeed, we are right. We can’t all be wrong…. can we? Tune in to the next installment for the righteous answers.

– Peter Winslow

 

Resolute Ideas Part Two

I’m life coach and star tsar Peter Winslow. Here are 20 more things for you to consider thoughtfully in the year 2017 to take charge of what moves and motivates you in life:

20 MORE THINGS TO CONSIDER IN 2017

  1. Laugh more often. Realize that this is how gratitude really feels.
  2. Refuse to argue. Instead, agree to disagree.
  3. Communicate with your family more often.
  4. Give something positive to someone each day.
  5. Forgive everyone for everything, including yourself.
  6. Spend more time with people over the age of 70 and under the age of 6.
  7. Make other people smile every day.
  8. Remember that what they think of you is none of your business.
  9. Your job won’t take care of you when you are sick, your friends will. Stay in touch.
  10. Walk your talk.
  11. Move everything that isn’t useful, beautiful or joyful out of your space.
  12. Know that everything that needs to heal, can be healed.
  13. Realize that everything changes.
  14. No matter how you feel, get up, dress up and show up.
  15. Believe that the best is yet to come.
  16. Start everyday feeling grateful.
  17. See the world with childlike wonder again.
  18. Accept what is. Modify your inner perception of it.
  19. Know that happiness is a personal choice.
  20. Choose wisely.

I trust this completed list of 40 Thing To Consider in 2017 has given you much to think about, and perhaps even more to take action on. Tally ho

–Peter Winslow