How the Mind Creates Stress Part Two

How the Mind Creates Stress Part Two
How the Mind Creates Stress Part Two

Hello, I’m life coach Peter Winslow, and the topic is stress and stress related illness. Let’s get right to it: in the short term, emotional stress can cause headache and pain, upset stomach, and heart palpitations. When our emotional traumas remain repressed or ignored, they can lead to ill conditions such as chronic autoimmune disorders. Heart disease, hypertension, obesity, alcoholism, drug abuse, fatigue, depression, and some cancers are just a few of the many common ailments attributed in part to chronic stress.

When under stress, the onboard survival mechanisms in the body can “hijack” the brain in response to a deadline, a dreaded phone call, an argument, or even just a scary thought. That’s why people can sit at a desk all day, and by the end of the workday feel exhausted, like they just ran a marathon. They simmer in a steady flow of stress hormones day after day and pay a heavy price for it.

Of course, stress is a subjective condition, meaning it’s not measured by the same yardstick for everyone. Some people thrive on stress while others run from it. One person’s idea of a good time can be terrifying to others; think bungee jumping, cage fighting, bull riding or drag racing. Staggering stress is an exciting thrill ride for some. For others it’s cardiac arrest.

In this way, we’re all fairly unique. The cells and tissues in our bodies hold the memories of past traumas, which are physical, emotional, and even ancestral in nature. Over time, it can take more extreme exposure to achieve the same “rush” we used to get from an exciting activity. Or the opposite can happen; the build-up of stress in the body can cause a host of problems, including chronic illness.

–Peter Winslow

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