The Difference Between Yoga and Meditation

peter winslow (life coach)
Peter Winslow, Life Coach

For nearly a decade, Peter Winslow has served as life coach and the owner of GoldMind, LLC, in Scottsdale, Arizona. In this capacity, he provides various services that help clients with such things as career advancement and wealth consciousness. An author of several books on healing and self-empowerment, Peter Winslow maintains a commitment to yoga and meditation.

Both meditation and yoga focus on helping practitioners relax and relieve stress. However, they go about this in two distinct ways.

Meditation focuses on the idea that the mind is the primary source of relaxation and connection. It boosts brain power and improves practitioners’ empathy, awareness, concentration, self-control, and many other brain benefits. This is done via relaxation techniques such as controlled breathing.

Conversely, yoga works the body and mind rather than just the mind. It is a physical activity that focuses not only on body connection and controlled breathing but also on moving, stretching, and aligning different areas of the body. This, in turn, loosens various muscles to help promote relaxation.

Since meditation focuses primarily on working the mind, it can be easier for some. Practitioners can meditate if they have just five minutes during the day, even with only a beginner’s knowledge. Yoga can be more difficult depending on the type and the particular poses attempted. The ability to personalize a yoga routine to fit each person’s fitness level and health goals is part of what makes yoga great for the body.

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Meditations

I’m life coach and transpersonal guide Peter Winslow. Most of you who know me, know I favor the early mornings for meditation. Most learned sages teach that four am, twelve noon and eight pm are the three times of day that provide the best opportunity for tuning in, with four am being the time when we are “nearest to the veil” that separates the material world from the essential realms. This is because everywhere on the planet, four am is the time at which everything is most quiet.

Just before the illuminating rays of dawn, nature rests in a state of flux. Terrestrial balance is stable, cleansed of the previous day’s frenetic energy and the effects of humanity’s dominion and industry. It’s in these early hours that the animal aspects of mind remain in slumber, though a deeper essence is fully awake. For a brief time, sleep has purged the emotional attachments we accumulate, and our subconscious acuity is highly perceptive.

Meditation at this still yet energetically reticulated time of day allows us to connect with inner awareness in a very profound and intimate way. Simple awareness becomes a mirror of worldly consciousness; as we awaken with the planet, we gain the opportunity to purposefully set the tone for the coming day. Even a slight moment of quietude at the muted moments of dawn can put the day into perspective. Each morning, our day’s destiny is not yet fixed, and as such there is nothing we cannot do.

Practice this yourself and discover what the wisest among us have taught from time immemorial: you are deeper than you know, deeper than you can know. It’s in our meditations that we witness the depth of who we truly are.

–Peter Winslow

How Your Mind Creates Stress

How Your Mind Creates Stress
How Your Mind Creates Stress

Hello, I’m life coach Peter Winslow. Lately we’ve been learning about stress and how it can cause severe illness and disease. Now let’s look at a definition. Wikipedia defines stress this way:

“Stress refers to the consequence of the failure of an organism— human or animal—to respond appropriately to emotional or physical threats, whether actual or imagined.”

Did you get that? Stress is not only caused by an actual threat, it’s also caused by nothing more than your imagination. As a life coach, I hear many examples of this from my clients on a daily basis.

Know why some people cry when the hero tragically dies during a movie? They know perfectly well that nobody really died, but their subconscious minds respond to the stimulus as if it were real. This is because the subconscious mind cannot tell the difference between what is real, and what is vividly imagined.

This is critical information to take advantage of if you’d like to improve your health. And by the way, without this inborn subconscious function, going to the movies wouldn’t be nearly as much fun!

We know that stress is a mental state that creates an emotional response in the body, which means it’s a mind-body phenomenon. And what is an emotional response? Emotions are electromagnetic signals sent out from the brain to communicate a particular message to the body at the cellular level. Then, neurochemicals and hormones kick in to provide what we feel in response to the mental information we’re busy processing.

Medical textbooks state that over 90 percent of all illnesses in the U.S. are due to stress and other mind-body factors. This means that nine times out of ten, there is an emotional stressor underlying the disease. Worry, frustration, anger, resentment, unworthiness, loneliness, anxiety, depression, and other emotional factors are known to cause the symptoms of stress, and lead to stress-related illness.

–Peter Winslow

Negative Or… Not?

I’m life coach Peter Winslow. Recently, someone in the life-coaching group advocated the exercise of rejecting all negative thoughts as they occur and accepting and acting upon only the positive ones. Could one do this for a week uninterrupted, she told, one’s life and fortunes would certainly change for the better.

Would that we could only entertain and act upon our likes and loves rather than being pushed and pulled by our fears or by worries and concerns over daily challenges. Some may think it naive to do so; that it may not be possible to live in a world where negative influences are not addressed or even acknowledged. However, there are others who live with the mindset that everything serves in some way or another and therefore nothing is truly negative.

These people vow that to adopt this philosophy for a week (or better yet—a month) will release us from ailments and suffering. They also suggest that in so doing we become a magnet to attract the people and resources we really desire. Do you buy it?

I’m going to do this for a month and I challenge you to join me:

Let’s believe only those thoughts which add to our faith and conviction in the goals we have set, and in ourselves. Immediately dismiss all others. The conflicting and challenging thoughts that often occur are only temporary and lacking any power to manifest in the world of form without our permission and belief.

We’ll check in with ourselves daily by using the practices of meditation and contemplation, remaining steadfast in the knowledge that what we put our beliefs in must come to pass. We now create from within and are never the “victims” of external circumstance.

– Peter Winslow